The Imposters -The Winds of Time

Randa Hamwi Duwaji is a member of one of my writer’s groups. She is a poet and author of children books, including Heartbeats in the Wind, Reflections of an Arab Woman. She has researched the Quran as written in the original Arabic language. Christianity is not the enemy of Islam and not Jesus, who is sited 93 times and referred to over 187 times in the Quran. One of the subtle themes of Aaron’s War is Arron’s religious confusion. The German’s he was asked to kill were praying to the Read More …

Keeping the Faith

I love poets, as much out of jealousy but also for the talent and the parallel universe they must live in. I would like to live there. Cindi Reiss is a member of one of my writing groups-The Phoenix Writers Club. She is a poet. She shared with me the following pantoum, which is a form of poetry. She offers the following description of this form. “The pantoum originated in Malaysia in the fifteenth-century as a short folk poem, typically made up of two rhyming couplets that were recited or Read More …

Page 53

How exciting it is to finish writing a novel. After the euphoria of finishing the manuscript subsides, reality grips you and sends you crashing to earth as you call on old business cells in the left side of your brain, the ones you retired from, the ones that drove you crazy to succeed at all cost, risk your body and soul in order to accumulate things. I always said when I finish my first novel I would be content to lay it proudly on the corner of my desk. Then Read More …

The Attic

The Attic is about the journey of man who lost the most important person in his life and how he finds love again through caring for a dying man. Byron Kelly lost his wife and abandoned a successful career in Seattle to move to Chicago and assume a new identity as Army Bendorf. He stumbles onto an embezzlement scheme. When he becomes a suspect he eludes the FBI by ducking into a house where he becomes trapped in an attic. The resident is a dying old man. As his health Read More …

The Deacon’s Masterpiece

    HAVE you heard of the wonderful one-hoss-shay, That was built in such a logical way It ran a hundred years to a day, And then, of a sudden, it–ah, but stay I ‘ll tell you what happened without delay, Scaring the parson into fits, Frightening people out of their wits,– Have you ever heard of that, I say? Seventeen hundred and fifty-five, Georgius Secundus was then alive,– Snuffy old drone from the German hive. That was the year when Lisbon-town Saw the earth open and gulp her down, Read More …

Aaron’s War

Aaron Vanko enlists to fight the Nazis, but the Iowa farm boy is conflicted over whether he can kill another human. Hours before being deployed, Aaron discovers he is a Jew, further disrupting his sense of self. Despite his moral dilemma, Aaron carries out his patriotic duty. He returns haunted by nightmares, and then flees Iowa to protect his loved ones from himself.

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The Journey from Home

Maybe is suspended by a thin thread high up between yes and no, the arbitrator of the two. Yes knows and no knows. Both can be wrong. Maybe sees beyond the end of the stream, knowing it does not end, is always seeking its way home. Maybe knows beyond the dark night that the sun can rise, and beyond the sunset a restful night. Voyage of Life Richard McMaster

Have you read this poem?

Henceforth I ask not good fortune—I myself am good fortune; Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing. Strong and content, I travel the open road. —Walt Whitman In this poem from Leaves of Grass, Whitman imagines traveling on the open road as the ultimate egalitarian experience, where beggars and drunkards find themselves beside an eloping couple, a doctor, and a rich man. “None are but accepted—none are but dear to me!” Whitman exclaims. He wants the reader to keep moving with him, never settling for long, never Read More …